Rules about stock dimensions.

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375Short
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Re: Rules about stock dimensions.

Post by 375Short »

Stocks and the design are of interest to silhouette shooters as you can measure by the response to this post. It reads to me like some agreement was found, some useful suggestions offered, mention of folks being professional while trying to help, photos to provide visual examples, all representing fellow competitors taking time to put thought into a question. It also reads like the original author may have been a little irritated or thin skinned (maybe just my interpretation) but when you ask folks to judge a cat that you bring to a dog show it’s best to be prepared for a little scrutiny. In the human brain looks matter, it’s how we are wired to make judgments to stay alive and it’s how we form first impressions. When you present something that looks different, regardless of rules, it will be unrealistic to expect sudden or widespread peer approval.
Getting judgment and guidance at places like this is a good approach, way better than in line at a big match on a hot day.
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PAndy
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Re: Rules about stock dimensions.

Post by PAndy »

Rule books are never perfect, for any sport or activity. Even if the NRA took an interest in making some particular updates, there would still be plenty of complaints for one thing or another. I encourage anyone: don't let an imperfect rule book keep you from enjoying and/or participating in the silhouette game. There is too much fun to be had.
c4p6t7r188
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Re: Rules about stock dimensions.

Post by c4p6t7r188 »

I'm just curious Mathew, what caused this thread? What is your end game? Am I even allowed to ask these questions? You are redesigning a 100% legal by your repetitive definition stock and just now asking questions? Is it a complete waste to question this stock if you're just going to replace it?

You made a thread asking questions, you applaud the people agreeing with you and act so guarded when asked questions. Mathew the one that can't be judged and only shoots for himself...why?

There is nothing wrong with what you're doing, but why is it you can ask for help and yet not give any input yourself...You called silhouette a dying sport...wtf are you doing here?!

Also do everyone a favor and post multiple angles of your stock especially top down.
MathewC
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Re: Rules about stock dimensions.

Post by MathewC »

Sent you all a DM instead of another wall of text here.
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Re: Rules about stock dimensions.

Post by MathewC »

PAndy wrote: Mon Sep 25, 2023 4:10 pm Rule books are never perfect, for any sport or activity. Even if the NRA took an interest in making some particular updates, there would still be plenty of complaints for one thing or another. I encourage anyone: don't let an imperfect rule book keep you from enjoying and/or participating in the silhouette game. There is too much fun to be had.
<3

Thanks. I am still learning, getting better, and having fun. Making a stock was part of that, and now I'm on to version 2.
lone ringer
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Re: Rules about stock dimensions.

Post by lone ringer »

Hello Everyone, just my two cents on this topic and some of the statements made here.
Our very challenging sport may not be dying but it sure is pretty sick in some parts of the country like mine in CA. and other western states.

The word Jig has never been in the rule book, neither the words two pound weight, although we use both things to check rifles at nationals and other important matches. To give you a little background on how the jig came to be, we have to go back to the HP Nationals in Phoenix 1977 where a petite army girl showed up with a Rem 700 Varmint in .308 win on a wood stock that resembled her air rifle as far as the stock measurements were concerned. Her rifle was approved and protested three times, even after some modifications to the stock. The final result was that she was allowed to shoot her rifle outside of the official competition. By the way she outshot the National champion by one point and since the winner was the one instigating the protests he got some much flack from the people in attendance that he quit the sport, never to be seen again.
The following year 1978 the silhouette committee announced new rules and stock measurements that for the most part we observe to this day. The first jig was made out of wood and since wood changes, they made it out of plexiglass.

In my opinion it would be nice if someone made some kind of box like the ones I hear they use on some pistol competition. Don't know if it would be possible to make one but it sure would simplify technical inspection at important matches.

The second part of my comment is about the few of us that rather than follow the rest as far as equipment is concerned, they like to make their own stocks, etc. My advice is that rather than to make them unwelcome at a match, even if it's a national match. Try to inspect their equipment and if for some reason, it does not pass the inspection using the jig, get the jury together and have them make the final decision. If it involves a shooter with little of no experience I see no reason for turning him/her away, let them shoot outside the competition like they did Karen Monez in 1977.

By the way we already had an Open rifle Class and it only lasted for one year, the reason being match directors did not want to have three rifle classes, so it was done away with the following year.
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